EXHIBITIONS/PRESS

For a complete list view my CV


April 21-29, 2017

“Without”

Selected for ArtFields Exhibition and Competition

Lake City, South Carolina

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ON VIEW NOW My work is currently represented on this website.  It’s a great opportunity to add my art to your collection!

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ON VIEW NOW NOVEMBER 1, 2016 – APRIL 21, 2016

“High Quality Information” selected for NAEA members exhibition

National Art Educators Association  Gallery & Office

901 Prince Street, Alexandria VA 22314

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Exhibit Hours: The exhibit will be open to the public Monday through Friday between the hours of 9:00 am and 3:30 pm, or by appointment. Please contact Kathryn Harvey for an appointment.

Questions? Contact Kathryn Harvey, NAEA Member Services Coordinator and Community Liaison: Kharvey@arteducators.org or 703.889.1297


OCTOBER 13-NOVEMBER 19, 2016

Sculptures and drawings on view at Redux Contemporary Art Center

Conolly Gallery

136 St. Phillips Street, Charleston SC

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September 11- October 25, 2015

701 Center for Contemporary Art, Columbia SC

“South Carolina Biennial”

ABOUT MY WORK ON VIEW

Intelligence is a subjective concept.  I have a lot of questions about contemporary education’s narrow vision of intellect.  Becoming a mother has offered me a window into seeing the depth of a child.  Contemporary educational practices of testing and data collection do not match up to this depth. My artwork is intended to address this deficiency and invite change.The women in these pieces represent the teachers who have nurtured and protected the voices of children.

THEME FOR THE GROUP EXHIBITION

Biennial Part I, September 10 – October 25, 2015

Artists:  Kristy Bishop, Eileen Blyth, Michael Cassidy, Colleen Critcher, Tonya Gregg, Tina Hirsig, Donna Hurt, Jason Kendall, Shannon Lindsey, Stephanie Shively, Michelle Van Parys, Katie Walker, Paul Yanko,

Biennial Part II, November 5 – December 20, 2015

Artists: Aldwyth, Brant Barrett, David Boatwright, Michaela Pilar Brown, Yvette Cummings, Stacey Davidson, Lauren Greenwald, Herb Parker, Kristi Ryba, Lee Sipe, Enid Williams, David Yaghjian,

701 Center for Contemporary Art present the South Carolina Biennial 2015, the center’s third survey exhibition of work by contemporary South Carolina artists. The exhibition will be held at 701 Center for Contemporary Art in Columbia. The 701 CCA S.C. Biennial 2015 will be presented in two parts with openings in September and November.

The goals of the Biennial exhibition are to provide a venue to showcase recent work reflecting local, regional and national trends and issues influencing contemporary artists living and working in South Carolina and to increase awareness and appreciation of the artistic contributions and accomplishments of the state’s visual artists. The exhibition draws on the breadth of the visual arts community by providing a multi-media juried statewide exhibition opportunity every two years.


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February 20 – April 3, 2015

Foundry Art Centre, St. Lois Missouri

“Contemporary Women Artists XVII- Reimagining Femmage” was sponsored by the Women’s Caucus for Art in St. Lois.

ABOUT MY WORK ON VIEW

Antique photographs purchased at a garage sale for one penny inspired these works. Each captures a candid moment of a woman’s life. The drawings are embellished and layered interpretations of these photographs. Through creating these works I am investigating the nature of women’s lives, their relationship with nature and those people they have surrounded themselves with.

THEME FOR THE GROUP EXHIBITION

Reimagining Femmage
The theme is base on the work of feminist artist Miriam Schapiro. Schapiro was born in Toronto, Canada in 1923. In the 1950s she specialized in gestural abstractions and in the 1960s in hard-edge paintings. Influenced by the feminist movement of the early 1970s, she changed her style radically, embracing the use of textiles as symbolic of feminine labor. Schapiro developed a method of collage, assemblage and painting that used found or saved material relating to women’s lives and traditionally female skills such as embroidery and quilting, calling it ‘femmage’.  She is credited with establishing the movement called Pattern and Decoration. This art movement challenged traditional Western European art by foregrounding decorative patterns and textiles from other cultures such as Chinese, Indian, Islamic, and Mexican.

Definition of “Femmage”:
1. It is work by a woman
2. The activities of saving and collecting are important ingredients
3. Scraps are essential to the process and are recycled in the work
4. The theme has a woman-life content
5. The work has elements of covert imagery
6. The theme of the work addresses itself to an audience of intimates
7. It celebrates private and public life
8. A diarist point of view is reflected in the work
9. There is drawing and/or handwriting sewn in the work
10. It contains silhouetted images which are fixed on material
11. Recognizable images appear in the narrative sequence
12. Abstract forms create pattern
13. The work contains photographs or other printed matter
14. The work has a functional as well as aesthetic life.

The Women’s Caucus for Art (WCA) is the leading national organization for women in the visual arts professions. Founded in 1972, it has 27 chapters across the country and is an affiliate society of the College Art Association. WCA is dedicated to the cultural, aesthetic and economic value of women’s art.


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November 14-December 23, 2014

Longmont, Colorado

“Cabinets of Curiosity” exhibition. It is sponsored by the Longmont Council for the Arts.

ABOUT MY WORK ON VIEW

THEME FOR THE GROUP EXHIBITION

Cabinets and containers inspired by the work of Joseph Cornell.  Two types of art were exhibited:

Cabinet category – created using a cabinet or a container with a door that the viewer can open and close.

Container category – pre-existing object that can be altered and imagery and objects added that remains open, but will not be touched by viewer.

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Spring Share 2014

Charleston Supported Art, Charleston SC

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ABOUT MY COMMISSIONED WORK

The series of artwork created for Charleston Supported Art explored the direct, visceral relationship I feel with nature. The photographs overlaid with the antique images of vital organs (heart, brain, nerves), and glass vials with seeds or soil combine to convey my experiences hiking and kayaking in the Lowcountry landscape.

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In The Studio with Tina Hirsig

Inspiration: Tina Hirsig

DESCRIPTION FOR COMMISSION

Modeled after the popular Community Supported Agriculture movement in which consumers invest in a local farm and receive recurring deliveries of fresh produce, Charleston Supported Art (CSA) gives art lovers the opportunity to purchase shares in exchange for original art created by a curated group of local, emerging and established artists. The program is part of a nationwide movement that has developed in over 40 communities across the country and is the first of its kind in Charleston, SC.


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ABOUT MY WORK ON VIEW

THEME FOR THE GROUP EXHIBITION     “A Celebration of Art”

ArtFields® is a unique Art Competition and Celebration to be held in the historic community of Lake City, South Carolina. This 10-day event features live music, dancing, delicious Southern foods, and cash prizes totaling $100,000 that will be awarded to winning artists, including the $50,000 Top Prize, the $25,000 Juried Panel prize, the $12,500 People’s Choice 2-D, and the $12,500 People’s Choice 3-D.


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July 2013

Enough Pie, Charleston SC

ABOUT MY WORK ON VIEW

This collaborative piece invited viewers to write their idea of “What is beauty?” on pieces of muslin and then hung on the suspended branches.  This collaboration of Tina Hirsig and Laura Gaffke stems from an ongoing collaborative art making process started in 2009.

THEME FOR THE GROUP EXHIBITION

“Awakening”

Join Enough Pie for Awakening, a one-day, one-time art + performance event held to breathe new life into 1600 MEETING and usher in an era of arts-driven community collaboration for the upper peninsula.

1600 Meeting will open for the first time in decades, allowing for creative reinterpretation during the 3-day window between cleanup and building renovation.

Participants are allowed two days to transform the space before doors open to the public on July 13. So please join Enough Pie and the talented folks listed below as we wake this 86-year-old sleeping giant once and for all.

Awakening Participants:CAROL ANTMAN
JARED BRAMBLETT
JUSTIN BREWER
MARTHA BRIM
ALYSON BURNS
Margaret Crane, THE ART BUS PROJECT
JOHN DUCKWORTH
SUSAN FARRELL
CARROLL FITZPATRICK
LAURA GAFFKE + TINA HIRSIG
KEVAN HOERTDOERFER + VASSILIKI FALKEHAG
HOLY CITY RAVEL ROUSERS
ALIZEY KHAN
GRET MACKINTOSH
JOHN MERRITT, TRADITIONAL SMALL CRAFT ASSOCIATION
SHAREN MITCHELL
AUSTIN NORVELL
ALEX + SARA RADIN, MELANIE SPINKS, BEVERLY CURRIN, BETHANY JEANICKE
KIM THOMAS
PATCH WHISKY

Haven’t had enough Tina?  Link to my resume HERE


Publications

“Tina Hirsig Dares to Dream: Wish List”

What’s the use in wishing on a falling star? You close your eyes, cross your fingers, and offer up a request, hoping that it will be granted. But beyond the initial thrill of the moment, the wish will likely go unfulfilled. However, for artist and art educator Tina Hirsig, expressing those wishes can provide a jumping off point for a good discussion.

This month she invited educators to her engrossing show at Plum Elements. Some of them wrote their own thoughts and wishes on strips of fabric that were then tied to a wishing line, installed in the center of Hirsig’s exhibition space. Now those wishes have become part of the show, hanging from the line like fragile off-white leaves wrapped around a horizontal vine. They’re marked with pleas for world peace, better educational opportunities, and more personal desires. Like other pieces in the show, the wishing line is tactile, functional, and good-looking.

The artist constantly sees parallels in art and education, seeking ways to make both fields more interactive and not just demonstrative. A separate series invites visitors to open cabinet doors to view the art within. There’s a good practical element to these pieces. Don’t have enough room to display several pieces of art in your home? Hirsig has the answer, condensing several ideas into each cabinet of curiosities.

Open the door into one of these worlds and you’ll see a heady mix of the familiar and the fanciful — curious, playful children running through a landscape of marshes, star maps, and circuitry. Using mixed-media collage, Hirsig uses objects and images to symbolize themes and feelings. Tiny, slender-winged birds represent the delicacy of nature in “I Wish for Our Children to Know How to Care for The Planet.” Blocks, electronic circuits, dice, and a triangle emblematize math and technological development in “I Wish that Our Children Will Be Encouraged to Be Inventive.”

Hirsig uses a time-consuming technique to create her landscapes, star charts, and other backgrounds. Initially a painter, she decided that she wanted to create transparencies. She discovered an artist who used photographic transfer methods, researched the process on the internet, and applied it to her own work.

First, she takes a photo, sometimes altering it in Photoshop. Then she takes it to a professional copier and gets a color copy made. She adds a matte medium onto the surface and puts the photo ink side down onto a layer of glue. Then she lets it dry for up to 24 hours (so it “cures”), adds water on top of the paper, and rubs it off. The ink sets into the glue, leaving a distinct image that has an aged quality. It’s an effective process that allows her to add several layers.

Hirsig also includes small objects — doll parts in a box, grass, and straw — to give her collages an even more three-dimensional quality. The outcome is part keepsake, part fine art. All of it can be hung on a wall, from the rectangular “I Wish” series to the different-sized cabinets.

Hirsig has obviously put a lot of time and thought into these pieces. The colors carefully complement each other, and although there’s always a lot going on, every assemblage is wrapped around a solid idea that stops it from getting too cluttered. “I Wish for Our Children to Be Seen as Wise” is a good example. Text, fabric, feathers, and grains of sand are all neatly aligned to represent the pursuit of wisdom. “Compassion” lines up shells, some painted with human figures and their shadows. Add nets, hands, and maps on a blue background, and you get pertinent references to the kindness, patience, and continual sense of discovery involved in a familial relationship.

There are lots of silhouettes, many depicting her own sons at play. Since faces are shown rarely, if at all, viewers are able to imagine their own children or themselves in younger days in place of the original subjects. Not all of the metaphorical imagery is subtle, but there’s a universal quality to the collages that increases their appeal. In “I Wish for Our Children to Experience Loving Relationships,” a small hand is held by an older, adult one. “Intuition” features wires and a keyboard backed by a photo transfer of leafy tree branches, conjuring up our contrasting life experiences of work and natural surroundings.

Hirsig’s wish for open-minded teachers and administrators won’t always be fulfilled. At best, she’ll encourage others to dream and question the status quo of our school system. As an educator, she feels that she doesn’t have much of a voice, so she expresses her opinions through her art. If that’s the case, then she’s expressed herself eloquently at Plum Elements.